Routines

Sticky Coins "A 3 coin vanishing routine" 

There are a number of multiple coin productions out there.  A multiple coin production is very useful to produce coins before using them in a multiple coin routine.   (For example:  a coins across routine or a coins through the table routine.)  A magic production adds flair instead of just pulling the coins out from a pocket or purse.  Conversely, there are various times in a routine where one might have multiple coins on a table or in the hand that you need to get rid of.  Of course you could simply dump them into your pocket, or again perform a multiple coin vanish to magically remove the coins. 

Seeking to find an easy, yet very entertaining multiple coin vanish, I devised a handling based on a routine in J.B. Bobo's New Modern Coin Magic book called "The Gadabout Coins".  The routine in Bobo's is a bit longer and drawn out and uses about 3 repetitious variations of a same effect before performing the ending moves.  In performing the routine, I personally found after the 2nd repetition you will start to lose the spectator's interest and its time to finish it up. The routine I perform eliminates the 3rd repetition, which I personally feel to be the weakest repetition in the book.  Below is my specific handling of what I call "Sticky Coins" since the basis of my patter is that the coins "want to stick together".  I will also describe the patter I devised for the routine.  I give the coins a little bit of personality, saying that they like being with each other, and don't want to leave each other.  The routine I perform is as follows: 

I usually perform this after a routine using 4 or more silver coins and I want to clean up.  (You need 4 coins to perform "Sticky Coins").  I say that,  "I will show them something interesting about these coins I use.  Let me get rid of a few of them." - I will leave 3 coins on the table, dump any extras into pockets and classic palm one in the Right Hand.  I explain, "when you do a lot of magic tricks with coins, the coins get very used to being with each other."  I take one coin and put it in my Left Hand and say, "When I take one away, the one in my hand here wants to leap out and join the two on the table."  I jokingly let the coin fall back out onto the two coins on the table.  "See?"  Then I pick up two coins in my right hand (holding them fanned with my index and thumb).  I display the two coins both sides using the Kaps/Malini subtlety (turning my wrist over far enough to show both sides but not far enough to show the spectator the coin classic palmed).  I turn my hand down and allow the classic palmed coin to drop onto my curled middle, ring, and pinky fingers.  I place all three coins into my left hand as the left hand closes.  I explain how, "The third coin on the table wants to join the two in my hand."  I pick up the coin from the table and put it in my right pocket (really classic palming the coin inside my pocket).  I say that,  "The coin has jumped from my pocket back to its friends in my left hand."  I open the left hand and allow the 3 coins to dump out.  "Incase you weren't watching closely I will show you how that is done again."  This time I take the two coins and plainly place them on my left hand, one coin on my palm, and one in finger palm position.  I then perform a Utility Switch; transferring seemingly both coins to my right hand (really finger palming one coin in the left hand).  I then make a fist with my left hand, thumb facing upward.  I take the two coins in my right hand and lay them on top of my left fist and let them visibly sink into the fist.  I take the coin on the table and really drop it in my pocket (make sure the spectators visibly see the coin go into the pocket).  And explain, "Once again it does not want to stay in the pocket, it has jumped back into my left hand".  I dump the 3 coins to the table again. 

At this point, I explain that "Even though the coins always like to jump back to each other, there is a problem that can occur.  It can be quite frustrating when the coins decide to be incorporative.  I'll show you what I mean".  I pick up one coin from the table and perform a retention vanish appearing to place the coin into my left hand while retaining it in fingertip rest position of my right hand.  As I reach for the 2nd coin on the table I classic palm the first coin in my right hand.  (Another vanish can be used in place of this move, the retention vanish is my personal favorite as it is a very strong visual vanish.  In any event the coin has to wind up classic palmed in the Right Hand).  I pick up the 2nd coin and perform Woodin's click pass (allowing the classic palmed coin to drop on top of the 2nd coin in my right hand which causes the coins to clink) as I appear to place them in my left hand (really retaining both coins in my right).  I finally reach for the 3rd coin on the table with my right hand (still containing the other 2 coins), picking it up with my thumb and index finger, I explain "Like last time this one (show it in the fingertips) goes into the pocket."  I place all three coins in the pocket.  I explain, "The problem that can occur is, this third coin wants to jump out of the pocket (I pull the one coin back out) and join its friends in my left hand (I pocket the coin again) but it cannot, because it has no idea on earth where its friends are."  I open my left hand to show to the spectators' amazement that the two coins are nowhere to be found. 

The routine works very well.  The spectators having seen a coin jump from the pocket to the hand twice, are now very mentally accustomed to this occurring.  They expect it to occur.  I have found this routine to grab great reactions of surprise when the hands are completely empty.

Head to the Videos section to view a performance of Sticky Coins.

At this point, I explain that "Even though the coins always like to jump back to each other, there is a problem that can occur.  It can be quite frustrating when the coins decide to be incorporative.  I'll show you what I mean".  I pick up one coin from the table and perform a retention vanish appearing to place the coin into my left hand while retaining it in fingertip rest position of my right hand.  As I reach for the 2nd coin on the table I classic palm the first coin in my right hand.  (Another vanish can be used in place of this move, the retention vanish is my personal favorite as it is a very strong visual vanish.  In any event the coin has to wind up classic palmed in the Right Hand).  I pick up the 2nd coin and perform Woodin's click pass (allowing the classic palmed coin to drop on top of the 2nd coin in my right hand which causes the coins to clink) as I appear to place them in my left hand (really retaining both coins in my right).  I finally reach for the 3rd coin on the table with my right hand (still containing the other 2 coins), picking it up with my thumb and index finger, I explain "Like last time this one (show it in the fingertips) goes into the pocket."  I place all three coins in the pocket.  I explain, "The problem that can occur is, this third coin wants to jump out of the pocket (I pull the one coin back out) and join its friends in my left hand (I pocket the coin again) but it cannot, because it has no idea on earth where its friends are."  I open my left hand to show to the spectators' amazement that the two coins are nowhere to be found. 

The routine works very well.  The spectators having seen a coin jump from the pocket to the hand twice, are now very mentally accustomed to this occurring.  They expect it to occur.  I have found this routine to grab great reactions of surprise when the hands are completely empty.

Head to the Videos section to view a performance of Sticky Coins.